FINE ART FOR FILM ADDICTS

'Singin' in the Rain' (1952)

Limited edition giclee printed on photo rag 308 gsm fine art paper

comedy musical romance


'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art
'Singin' in the Rain' (1952) - film-art

Regular price £139.00 Sale

Please select a size and framing option

Preview Matinee Feature Blockbuster Premiere
Unframed Black White Oak



Notes on sizing

All measurements given are for the printed image only. To calculate the overall dimensions of a framed print please add 200mm to both the horizontal and vertical measurements.

Example: A print image that is specified as being 825mm x 351m will sit inside a frame that has the approximate outside dimensions of 1025mm x 551mm.

'Singin' in the Rain' (1952)

Limited edition giclee printed on photo rag 308 gsm fine art paper

Director: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly

Writers : Betty Comden, Adolph Green

Stars : Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds

1927 Hollywood. Monumental Pictures' biggest stars, glamorous on-screen couple Lina Lamont and Don Lockwood, are also an off-screen couple if the trade papers and gossip columns are to be believed. Both perpetuate the public perception if only to please their adoring fans and bring people into the movie theaters. In reality, Don barely tolerates her, while Lina, despite thinking Don beneath her, simplemindedly believes what she sees on screen in order to bolster her own stardom and sense of self-importance. R.F. Simpson, Monumental's head, dismisses what he thinks is a flash in the pan: talking pictures. It isn't until